Lebanese Media – a Family Affair

first_imgCombined with a deeply divided political landscape and a lack of proper means of regulation, these trends in audience concentration pose a high risk to media pluralism in Lebanon. Related documents 181206_mom_lebanon_jm_cm.docxVND.OPENXMLFORMATS-OFFICEDOCUMENT.WORDPROCESSINGML.DOCUMENT – 22.56 KB LebanonMiddle East – North Africa Media independence Organisation January 14, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Lebanon Media Ownership Monitor “Political familism” “Lebanon’s political and sectarian diversity is widely reflected in the media. But it has also allowed regimes across the Middle East to interfere in its affairs in many ways, including by investing in its media sector. Since the financial crisis and the Arab Spring, this sector has been witnessing a drain of these funds for better or worse,” observed Ayman Mhanna, the Samir Kassir Foundation’s Executive Director. “What’s left is an overcrowded market that is neither sustainable nor independent.” Media contacts “Lebanon is a telling example,” added Olaf Steenfadt, RSF’s Global Project Director for MOM. “We can observe here that a lack of laws and law enforcement doesn’t necessarily mean more freedom. ‘Laissez-faire’ all too often serves those few who can afford to bypass rules and consolidate their power.” Transparency games and legal tricks MOM analyzed 37 outlets with the largest audience shares in Lebanon. The research revealed that the country’s media landscape is highly concentrated. The top four TV companies, LBCI SAL, Al Jadeed SAL, MTV SAL, and Alubnianiya lil Ilam (OTV), combine nearly 8 out of 10 viewers (78.1% of the audience). They are respectively owned by the Khayat, Daher-Saad, Aoun, and Gabriel Murr families. In the print sector, the top four companies, Al Joumouhouria News Corp SAL, Annahar SAL, Akhbar Beirut SAL and Al Nahda SAL (Addiyar), concentrate almost as much: 77.9% of the daily readership. Their respective main shareholders are the Michel Elias Murr, Hariri, and Tuéni Families, Ibrahim Al Amine, and Charles Ayoub. The radio sector is slightly less concentrated with the top four companies, Société Moderne d’Information SAL (VDL 93.3), Liban Libre pour la Production et la Diffusion SAL (RLL), El Mada Group SARL (Sawt El Mada), and Société Nouvelle d’Information Audiovisuelle (VDL 100.5) reaching 72% of the listenership. The top four respective shareholders are the Khazen Family, the Lebanese Forces, Elias Bou Saab, and the Phalange Party. Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” LebanonMiddle East – North Africa Media independence Compared with all 16 existing MOM country editions so far, Lebanon shows the highest rate of political affiliation with 29 outlets out of 37 (78.4%) being either directly owned by the state, current or former members of parliament or the executive, parliamentary candidates, or by political parties. The Samir Kassir Foundation: Jad Shahrour: +961 3 571 470 – [email protected] Reporters Without Borders Germany: Ulrike Gruska/Christoph Dreyer/Anne Renzenbrink/Juliane Matthey, media relations officers:  0049 30 6098 9533 55 – [email protected] to go further For the first time, the identity of these players, but also their underlying interests, structures, and connections are now visible after a comprehensive, data-journalistic investigation presented in Beirut today. Jointly conducted by Reporters without Borders and the Samir Kassir Foundation’s SKeyes Center for Media and Cultural Freedom, the Media Ownership Monitor (MOM) – Lebanon is now available at http://lebanon.mom-rsf.org in Arabic and English. News As a result, Lebanese media operate in a clan manner, based on family and political interests. At least 43% of the media outlets covered by MOM count at least one member of the following 12 families in their ownership or board – or both: Aoun, Daher-Saad, Eddé, Fares, Hariri, Khayat, Khazen, Mikati, Murr, Pharaon, Salam, and Tuéni. More than a third is directly owned by one of them. According to the MOM findings, most of the ownership schemes are designed to put the control of certain media outlets in one family’s hands. Initiated by Reporters Without Borders and funded by the German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Media Ownership Monitor (MOM) is a global research and advocacy project to promote transparency and media pluralism worldwide. In Lebanon, it was conducted together with the Samir Kassir Foundation. Country studies have been published so far in Albania, Brazil, Colombia, Cambodia, Ghana, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Peru, the Philippines, Serbia, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Tunisia, Turkey and Ukraine. All MOM results are available online at www.mom-rsf.org.   Although transparency is officially required for any Lebanese media outlet registered as a company, most of the publicly available information was outdated. Moreover, existing legal provisions can be easily circumvented, which provides yet another evidence that law enforcement stops at the doorstep of powerful politicians. The MOM team found out that some media outlets operate outside the scope of the law, that a series of restrictions imposed by the Audiovisual Media Law of 1994 are ignored or clearly violated by some broadcast media owners, and that more than 60 political publications still have licenses although they have stopped printing and publishing years ago. In a context where most of the media owners covered by the MOM survey are politicians who serve or have served in government positions or in parliament, accountability becomes an illusion, as they are judge and party at the same time. Often seen as the most liberal and free media environment in the Arab World, Lebanon’s media landscape appears tightly aligned with domestic and foreign powers vying for control. Key political groups but also wealthy family clans benefit from a weak or dysfunctional legal framework that reflects an overall laissez-faire attitude. Thus, they have managed to maintain and even extend their grip on pockets of public opinion throughout the dramatic events that have unfolded in and around this country in the last decades. News RSF_en December 6, 2018 Lebanese Media – a Family Affair Lebanese journalist found shot dead in car Concentrated markets in the hands of some eight families and three political parties The Samir Kassir Foundation is a Lebanese non-profit organization officially established in Beirut under registry number 30/A.D., founded on February 1, 2006. It is named after Samir Kassir, a Lebanese journalist assassinated in Beirut on June 2, 2005. It aims to spread democratic culture in Lebanon and the Arab world, encourage new talents in journalism, and build the movement for a cultural, democratic, and secular renewal.  These are the conditions to lift the Arab populations out of their state of malaise, as described in Samir Kassir’s book Being Arab. The Foundation strives to defend freedom of media and culture through the SKeyes Center for Media and Cultural Freedom that it has been hosting since 2008. It has become the largest center to monitor violations against journalists and artists in the Arab Levant as well as a reference point for research on journalism and for training media professionals and enhancing their skills. Reporters without Borders and the Samir Kassir Foundation launch the Media Ownership Monitor in Lebanon. February 4, 2021 Find out more November 11, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts News Highest rate of political affiliation Legal restrictions to limit ownership monopolies do exist in the broadcast sector (TV and radio), but the media sector overall remains very much a political families’ reserve. In the course of the research, the MOM team found at least 12 famous dynasties involved in the media sector. The Hariri family owns major shares in media outlets and is the only one to have stakes in all four media sectors (print and online, radio and TV). All outlets that they co-own combine at least 29.6% of the country’s print circulation (Al Mustaqbal, The Daily Star and Annahar), 7.7% of the radio audience (Radio Orient), and 7.8% of the TV audience (Future TV). Four other media owners are present in more than one media sector. These politically affiliated outlets account for the entirety of the TV viewership, a print readership share of 93.5%, and a radio listenership share of 79.3%. Moreover, some of the most popular online news platforms belong to political parties, further amplifying the high risk of media politicization and polarization. Help by sharing this information News Lebanon : Violence against reporters becoming more frequent in Lebanon Beirut, December 6, 2018 – The seemingly buzzing Lebanese media market is, in fact, controlled by only a few highly politicized owners that are either directly affiliated with political parties or belong to Lebanese dynasties. Additional threats to media pluralism arise from clear editorial lines defined by politics, close ties among the dynasties, and a number of regulatory shortcomings. Lebanese law does not include provisions on conflicts of interests that could prevent government figures and members of parliament or their family members from owning shares in media organizations. Media owners are not obliged to disclose their political affiliations, for example towards the Commercial Register of the Ministry of Justice.last_img read more

Dodgers’ offense stuck in a ‘lull’ as they lose to Padres

first_img Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco “This is baseball,” explained Justin Turner who went 3 for 5 and drove in two of the Dodgers’ runs with a solo home run and an RBI double. “If you expect us to score 10, 12 runs every single night, you guys are out of your mind. Just gotta keep working, keep trying to put together ABs.“Stuff like this happens throughout the course of a season to every single team no matter how good or bad they are. So – this is baseball.”It is not the kind of baseball the Dodgers have played most of this season.They have scored no more than three runs in eight of their past nine games, batting .228 as a team even with last Tuesday’s 16-3 rout of the Toronto Blue Jays included. For most of the year, the Dodgers have struck out less often than all but a handful of teams. But they have had double-digit strikeouts in seven of those past nine games, including 52 in their past four games.“It’s just the season,” Dodgers outfielder A.J. Pollock said. “You go through stretches where – look at the last inning. I don’t really want to swing at any of those pitches and I strike out. It just happens. Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire One run scored on the base hit but another scored when Pollock’s throw went over the head of the cutoff man, Corey Seager, and skipped through Turner’s legs at third base and into the Dodgers’ dugout with May failing to back up the base.“I thought I made some good pitches. Things just didn’t fall my way in the sixth inning,” May said. “There’s no excuse. I’ve got to be behind the ball. I can’t let it get into the dugout.”Naylor moved to third on the error and scored on a groundout, giving the Padres the lead.“Just kind of one of those unfortunate things that proved to be the difference in the game,” Roberts said of the decisive misplay.“I thought he (May) threw the ball well tonight. You look at the pinch-hitter … left a curveball up. Then there’s a soft-serve base hit and a seeing-eye grounder that beat the shift. That inning kind of spun out but I think as far as quality of pitches the curveball to Allen was certainly a mistake but other than that I thought he threw the ball well.”center_img PreviousPadres relief pitcher Kirby Yates, right, celebrates with catcher Francisco Mejia after the final out of their 4-3 victory over the Dodgers on Monday night in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May works against a San Diego Padres batter during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May works against a San Diego Padres batter during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsPadres starting pitcher Eric Lauer works against a Los Angeles Dodgers batter during the second inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Padres starting pitcher Eric Lauer works against a Los Angeles Dodgers batter during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)The Dodgers’ Justin Turner watches the flight of his solo home run during the third inning of Monday’s game against the Padres in San Diego. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner (10) is greeted by third base coach Dino Ebel after hitting a home run during the third inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres, Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: Third base coach Dino Ebel #12 congratulates Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after his solo homerun during the third inning of a game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner, right, is greeted by teammate Chris Taylor after hitting a home run during the third inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres, Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May looks in as he works against a San Diego Padres batter during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May bobbles a ground ball before throwing out San Diego Padres’ Josh Naylor at first during the fourth inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May bobbles a ground ball before throwing out San Diego Padres’ Josh Naylor at first during the fourth inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)San Diego Padres’ Eric Hosmer, right, reacts after hitting an RBI single as Los Angeles Dodgers right fielder Cody Bellinger stands on first base, left, during the fourth inning of a baseball game, Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)The Dodgers’ Justin Turner connects for an RBI double during the fifth inning of Monday’s game against the Padres in San Diego. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Dodgers’ Max Muncy scores on an RBI double by Justin Turner, not pictured, as Padres catcher Francisco Mejia is unable to make the tag during the fifth inning of Monday’s game at PETCO Park in San Diego. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers looks on after hitting a solo home run during the sixth inning of a game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers looks on after hitting a solo homerun during the sixth inning of a game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is congratulated in the dugout after hitting a solo homerun during the sixth inning of a game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: George Lombard #29 of the Los Angeles Dodgers congratulates Dustin May #85 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after his single during the fourth inning of a game against the San Diego Padresat PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: Adam Kolarek #56 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches during the sixth inning of a game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 26: Greg Garcia #5 is congratulated by Eric Hosmer #30 of the San Diego Padres after scoring on a throwing error during the sixth inning of a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at PETCO Park on August 26, 2019 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Dodgers’ Justin Turner reacts to umpire Rob Drake after being called out on strikes to end Monday’s game in San Diego as Padres catcher Francisco Mejia walks toward the mound to celebrate with his teammates. Turner went 3 for 5 and drove in two runs in the Dodgers’ 4-3 loss. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Dodgers’ Justin Turner argues with umpire Rob Drake after being called out on strikes to end Monday’s game against the Padres in San Diego. Turner went 3 for 5 and drove in two runs in the Dodgers’ 4-3 loss. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Padres relief pitcher Kirby Yates, right, celebrates with catcher Francisco Mejia after the final out of their 4-3 victory over the Dodgers on Monday night in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May works against a San Diego Padres batter during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)NextShow Caption1 of 23Dodgers starting pitcher Dustin May works against a San Diego Padres batter during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)ExpandSAN DIEGO — The Dodgers should be back in their happy place – the NL West.Overpowered (nine home runs to two) by the American League’s best team over the weekend, the Dodgers headed south to start a stretch of 13 consecutive games in their own division. But the San Diego Padres scored three times in the sixth inning against rookie right-hander Dustin May and handed the Dodgers a 4-3 defeat on Monday night.Even with the loss, the Dodgers are 36-19 against their woebegone competition in the NL West and their magic number to clinch a seventh consecutive division title is down to 11 – making it very likely they will hold their clinching party during this two-week stroll through the neighborhood.But they are not entering it at full speed. The offense is in a “lull” – Dodgers manager Dave Roberts’ word choice – having scored more than three runs in a game just once in their past nine games (last Tuesday’s 16-3 romp over the Toronto Blue Jays). Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start “You’ve just got to stay with it. The key is not to change. Just try to hunt your pitches and sometimes you don’t get them.”The game ended with the Dodgers’ 13th strikeout of the game – the fifth on a called third strike by home plate umpire Rob Drake, who did wonders for Padres catcher Francisco Mejia’s framing statistic Monday.“There was a lot of very questionable calls throughout the game,” said Turner, who wound up nose to nose with Drake after the final pitch. “He called strike three and I asked him, ‘You called that a strike?’ He told me it was right down the middle which was pretty upsetting. If he thinks that was right down the middle, no wonder he was missing so many pitches throughout the night.“Then he walks into me and told me not to bump him which, you know, also upsets me. I’m not trying to bump him or touch him in any way. But when you walk into me and then cry foul like I hit you or something is brutal.”The Dodgers had other reasons to be upset.Rookie right-hander Dustin May retired the first nine Padres in order before giving up a leadoff walk in the fourth inning and a two-out RBI single to Eric Hosmer.But Turner and Kiké Hernandez (a solo home run in the top of the sixth inning) sent May out to the mound in the bottom of the sixth with a 3-1 lead.The sixth inning has not been May’s friend. Eleven of the 14 runs he has allowed in his MLB career (four starts and a relief appearance) have come in the sixth inning of those games.Against the Padres, it started with a leadoff double by pinch-hitter Austin Allen. He went to third on a single by Greg Garcia. Josh Naylor made it three consecutive hits to start the inning when he bounced a soft single into center field.Related Articles Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies last_img read more